USGA/RCGA Handicap Mode




Select Handicap Calculation Mode


There are three modes available for calculating handicaps:



Note: You can switch between USGA, RCGA, and CUSTOM calculation modes at any time. Switching handicap modes has no effect on scoring data; handicaps are simply recalculated based on the new setting.


Follow these instructions to select a handicapping mode:


  1. In Handicap System, activate the Options Menu by placing your pointer inside the area marked below in orange



  2. Click on "Manage / Load" link under "Rosters" section on the Options Menu (pictured above at top)

  3. Select the Roster for which you want to setup handicap calculation parameters by clicking on the Roster name link



  4. On the Roster Settings window, click on the "Calculation Setup" tab



  5. Click on the Calculation Mode drop down menu to select a 9- or 18-hole USGA, RCGA or Custom handicapping mode

 

USGA \ RCGA Handicap Mode


You can change the ceiling for the USGA Index and RCGA Factor. The recommended ceilings are 36.4 for men and 40.4 for women (18.2 / 20.2 for nine holes). However, you can relax the Index (or RCGA) ceiling if desired. Any 18 hole handicap that exceeds the standard USGA \ RGCA limit is identified in with a "L" (to indicate a Local handicap).  Any 9 hole handicap that exceeds the standard USGA \ RGCA limit is identified with a "J" (to indicate a 9 hole local handicap).  A Handicap Index computed above the limit can only be used for intra-club play.

How are USGA \ RCGA handicap Indexes calculated?


Handicap System uses the exact formulas established by the USGA and RCGA to calculate indexes and factors. Below is a brief overview of the basics formulas used to calculate handicap indexes and factors. Many details are NOT discussed here..such as the "Reduction of Handicap Index for Exceptional Tournament Performance". For complete information about USGA handicapping, visit the USGA website at www.usga.org.  For information about RCGA visit their website at www.rcga.org

Step 1:


The first step is to enter only a golfer's adjusted gross scores (not gross scores). To adjust an original gross score you use the Equitable Stroke Control (ESC).  ESC is used to downwardly adjust individual hole scores for handicapping purposes in order to create handicaps that better represent a golfer's playing ability. ESC prescribes a maximum number of strokes that can be entered for any hole. This maximum is based on the golfer's Course Handicap and is obtained from the table shown below. Note: You must enter scores hole by hole (use score card) for the software to automatically calculate an adjusted gross score.

18 hole handicapping

USGA



RCGA


Course Handicap

Limit on any hole


Course Handicap

Limit on any hole

9 or less

Double bogey


9 or less

Double bogey

10 through 19

7


10 through 19

7

20 through 29

8


20 through 29

8

30 through 39

9


30 through 39

9

40 and above

10


40 and above

10

9 hole handicapping

USGA



RCGA


Course Handicap

Limit on any hole


Course Handicap

Limit on any hole

4 or less

Double bogey


4 or less

Double bogey

5 through 9

7


5 through 9

7

10 through 14

8


10 through 14

8

15 through 19

9


15 through 19

9

20 or more

10


20 or more

10

Maximum strokes per hole are allowed according to the player's course handicap.  If a golfer does not yet have an index, the maximum allowed index will be used. (36.4 / 18.2 for men, 40.4 / 20.2 for women--for 18 \ 9 hole

handicaps).

Step 2:


The second step in computing a Handicap Index is to compute a Handicap Differential for each score that is to be considered in the Handicap Index calculation. The Handicap Differential is computed using the following formula:

Handicap Differential = (Adjusted Gross Score -  Course Rating) X 113  / Slope Rating

(113 is the Base Slope, or the Slope Rating of a course of standard difficulty according to the USGA.)

If your adjusted gross score is more than the Course Rating for the course on which the round was played, the Handicap Differential will be a positive number. If your adjusted gross score is lower than the Course Rating, the Handicap Differential will be negative.

Step 3:


The third step in calculating your Handicap Index is to select the lowest Handicap Differentials. The following table is used when selecting the best, or lowest, Handicap Differentials. If more than 20 scores have been entered, the 10 best differentials of the 20 most recent scores are used for the calculation.

USGA System

Number of  Handicap

Differentials Available

Handicap

Differentials

Used

RCGA System

Number of Handicap

Differentials Available

Handicap

Differentials

Used

5 or 6 *

Lowest 1

5 to 6*

Lowest 1

7 or 8

Lowest 2

7 or 8

Lowest 2

9 or 10

Lowest 3

9 or 10

Lowest 3

11 or 12

Lowest 4

11 or 12

Lowest 4

13 or 14

Lowest 5

13 or 14

Lowest 5

15 or 16

Lowest 6

15 or 16

Lowest 6

17

Lowest 7

17

Lowest 7

18

Lowest 8

18

Lowest 8

19

Lowest 9

19

Lowest 9

20

Lowest 10

20

Lowest 10

* The USGA \ RCGA does not calculate a handicap until five scores have been recorded.


Step 4:


The fourth step in computing the Handicap Index is to calculate the average of the selected lowest Handicap Differentials. Simply add the selected Handicap Differentials together and divide by the number of selected Handicap Differentials.

Step 5:


The fifth step in calculating the Handicap Index is to compute the net Handicap Differential average. For the USGA, and RCGA System the percentage by which the Handicap Differential averages are multiplied is 96%.

Step 6:


Step six in computing the Handicap Index, is to delete the digits after the tenths place of the net Handicap Differential average. Do NOT round off to the nearest tenths place. As established by the USGA, the default maximum Handicap Index on an 18-hole course is 36.4 for males and 40.4 for females. On a nine-hole course the default maximum Handicap Index is 18.2 for males and 20.2 for females.  The maximum ceiling can be increased.

Example of a  Handicap Index Calculation

The following is an example of how the Handicap Index is calculated using the USGA System. This example assumes only 14 scores have been posted for this golfer.

Sum of the lowest five Handicap Differentials:

68.7

Average of lowest Handicap Differentials (68.7 divided by 5):

13.74

Handicap Differential Average multiplied by 96%:

13.1904

Delete digits after tenths place:

13.1

Handicap Index (factor for RCGA):

13.1

Step 7:


The final step is to calculate a Course Handicap.

A Course Handicap is the number of strokes a player receives on each particular course.

The computer determines a course handicap by multiplying the Handicap Index by the Slope Rating (from the course and tee you choose) and dividing by 113 (the base slope) then rounding to the nearest whole number.

                                

Course Handicap =   Index   X   (Slope of Tee  /  113)


Example of a  Handicap Index Calculation

The following assumes an index of 12.5 and a Home course slope of 120.


Course Handicap =  12.3 x 120/113 = 13



More about USGA Handicapping


The Handicap System can calculate indexes and handicaps using the exact USGA (United States Golf Association) calculation formulas and nomenclature.  This also includes the "Reduction of Handicap Index for Exceptional Tournament Performance". If a player consistently scores better in tournaments, his\her handicap is subject to adjustment by the "USGA Handicap Index for Exceptional Tournament Performance".

However, just because you have our software does not automatically mean you can issue USGA handicaps.  Your organization must first be in compliance with USGA guidelines to issue USGA handicaps.  Any organization wishing to issue USGA handicaps should be familiar with the guidelines and rules required by the USGA.  These guidelines and rules are thoroughly discussed in the "USGA Handicap System Manual".  For details visit the USGA website at www.usga.org

Note:  If your organization does not qualify to issue USGA handicaps, you can still use the Handicap System to issue a custom handicap which emulates the USGA. This would not be an official USGA handicap, but would be very close.

See Custom Mode.

Below is a brief overview of requirements required by USGA to issue USGA handicaps.  The basic qualification is called peer review.  The USGA's peer review requirements are paramount for any golf club that wishes to issue USGA Handicap Indexes to its members. In brief, peer review means that golfers regularly play together.  Scores are posted personally, in a timely manner, at a common location.  Reports are posted for all to see and "peers" have an opportunity to know what scores other "peers" are posting.  In essence, the purpose of peer review is to keep all golfers honest.  These are excerpts from the "USGA Handicap System Manual":

DEFINITION OF A GOLF CLUB


Section 2 of the USGA Handicap System™ defines a golf club as follows:


A “golf club” is an organization of at least ten individual members that operates under bylaws with committees (including a Handicap Committee) to supervise golf activities, provide peer review, and maintain the integrity of the USGA Handicap System (see Compliance Checklist, Section 8-2m; Decision 2/7). A golf club must be licensed by the USGA® to utilize the USGA Handicap System. A club can obtain a license agreement directly from the USGA or through its membership in an authorized golf association that is already licensed by the USGA and that has jurisdiction in the geographic area that includes the principal location of the golf club.


Each golf club must determine its type. A golf club is one of three (3) types:


  1. It is located at a single specific golf course with a valid USGA Course Rating® and USGA Slope Rating® where a majority of the club’s events are played and the club’s scoring records reside; or
  2. Its members are affiliated or known to one another via a business, fraternal, ethnic or social organization. The majority of the club members had an affiliation prior to organizing the club; or
  3. The members had no prior affiliation and a majority of the recruiting and sign-up of the membership is done by solicitation to the general public (e.g., Internet, newspaper).